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Ask me anything   Art, music, science and technology, and ranting

rambozus:

itsmemorized:

Oh my GOD
My grandma bought my grandpa new pants and my mom asked him how they felt and he goes “like a cheaply made castle” and we were like what and he goes “no ballroom”
GRANDPA NO

Grandpa yes.

(via pixlezq)

— 18 hours ago with 114266 notes

quillery:

I got goodies in the mail from littledigits! *O* She sent me a bunch of prints of her gorgeous fairy drawings and included an original sketch of Nemie as well! SO CUTE AAAAAHHH. Thank you so much!! <3

— 18 hours ago with 411 notes
laurenmoran:

I’ve been waiting for this to come around so I could reblog it

laurenmoran:

I’ve been waiting for this to come around so I could reblog it

(Source: noslowsongs, via nevalkitty)

— 19 hours ago with 106960 notes
awwww-cute:

I would have gotten more if he had stayed asleep

awwww-cute:

I would have gotten more if he had stayed asleep

(via nevalkitty)

— 19 hours ago with 181915 notes
Questlove Makes a Case For Iggy Azalea, Calls "Fancy" the Song of the Summer →

deepcotton57821:

bitteroreo:

crankyskirt:

sauicerspice:

afro-dominicano:

dynastylnoire:

darkmoonperfume:

Weigh in on what Questlove said

NO

Not Questlove :/

lmao this is the nigga who wrote a long-ass piece on how fucking hard it is to live as a “visble” Black man (and a tall, big one at that) and this nigga can’t really understand why Black woman wouldn’t be fucking w/ ol girl? Why do all the conscious niggas suddenly chill when it mostly Black women talking about a problem?

I enjoy the Roots’ back catalog, as well as Quest’s afro, but I feel like he’s the current poster boy for “dark-skinneded industry dude who still has a complex about Black girls not checking for him in high school” (see: Uncle Ruckus’ play-nephew A$AP Rocky).

This is the shit we talking bout’. When Black Women need Black Men’s support, on issues that will impact us, we get this shit. It’s always, “We need to open up our hearts.” it’s always “We need to share” whenever it’s about some damaging oppression that erases Black Women, we always have to “move over and make room.” And if we don’t do it nicely, and peacefully “We’re bitter black bitches, who hate anre are envious of non black women.” So we can talk about Macklemore and how Kendrick was robbed, how Black Men are overlooked in being rewarded for their music, and Black Women have jumped in supporting and defending, when we ask for support, for understanding, for acknowledgement of the harmful affects Iggy, Miley, Kreyshawn, are having on Black Women…..we get we need to chill. Now when’s it about Black Female Culture, it can no longer be appropriated, or gentrified, it can’t be stolen, it’s contagious like a damn disease and Black Women need to turn the other cheek, that’s some bullshit. Black Power is for Black Men.

Black Power is for Black Men.

— 19 hours ago with 397 notes
lackadaisycats:

Hmm.  Looks rather better this way.

lackadaisycats:

Hmm.  Looks rather better this way.

(Source: claudia-cher)

— 19 hours ago with 3135 notes
nprfreshair:

A debut novel by Yelena Akhtiorskaya puts a fresh, comic spin on the age-old coming to America story. Her novel is called Panic in a Suitcase and Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan has a review: 

I can’t tell you the names of my great-grandparents, left behind in Poland and Ireland, because nobody ever mentioned them.  The break was that final.  
These days of course, it’s different.  Within the space of a few hours, people can fly across oceans; through skyping and e-mail, they can electronically commute between Old World and New.  Three cheers for The March of Progress, right?  Except, if you want to make a definitive break how can you when the Old World is always calling you on the phone, texting, and crashing on your living room couch for extended visits? That’s the crucial question Yelena Akhtiorskaya mulls over in her sharply observed and very funny debut novel, Panic in a Suitcase.  Akhtiorskaya, who was born in Odessa and emigrated to the Russian immigrant enclave of Brighton Beach, Brooklyn at the age of seven, writes of the fictional Nasmertov family, whose move from Old World to New imitates her own.  

nprfreshair:

A debut novel by Yelena Akhtiorskaya puts a fresh, comic spin on the age-old coming to America story. Her novel is called Panic in a Suitcase and Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan has a review: 

I can’t tell you the names of my great-grandparents, left behind in Poland and Ireland, because nobody ever mentioned them.  The break was that final. 

These days of course, it’s different.  Within the space of a few hours, people can fly across oceans; through skyping and e-mail, they can electronically commute between Old World and New.  Three cheers for The March of Progress, right?  Except, if you want to make a definitive break how can you when the Old World is always calling you on the phone, texting, and crashing on your living room couch for extended visits? That’s the crucial question Yelena Akhtiorskaya mulls over in her sharply observed and very funny debut novel, Panic in a Suitcase.  Akhtiorskaya, who was born in Odessa and emigrated to the Russian immigrant enclave of Brighton Beach, Brooklyn at the age of seven, writes of the fictional Nasmertov family, whose move from Old World to New imitates her own.  

(via npr)

— 19 hours ago with 371 notes